Why Is Team Collaboration Not Enough?

By Tom Stone

Expanding beyond team/social collaboration to business collaboration

The term “collaboration” has become one of the primary hot topics for businesses and analysts throughout the industry lately. At its most basic level, “collaboration” simply means “working with others in a coordinated fashion toward a common goal.” But few actually attempt to define what it really means in the context of business and PPM.

If you ask most people what capabilities define collaboration in the workplace, they generally talk about the sharing of information within a given team: document management, threaded discussions, activity feeds, instant messaging, shared calendars, task assignments, facilitation of problem solving and idea development, communication of decisions and meeting minutes, etc. This is all good, and certainly helps a team move forward in coordinated fashion toward the common goal of completing a project or specific unit of work. Nearly all PPM solutions provide functionality to address each of these needs within the scope of a project. SaaS PPM solutions are particularly well-suited to providing this level of team collaboration since, by their very nature, they are accessible to all team members regardless of geographic diversity and the information they contain is always available in near real-time.

I would argue, however, that this limited view of collaboration is incomplete. Looked at from a broader perspective, an entire organization can be viewed as a collection of units which must all work together in a coordinated fashion toward the common goal of alignment and execution against the business’ corporate vision and strategic objectives. Thus, business-level collaboration is necessary to establish the direction for an entire organization. “Business Direction” includes the definition for the organization’s Vision, Goals and Strategies. By sharing and collaborating on the Business Direction, the business teams will be better prepared to drive the various work efforts. True business-level collaboration therefore depends on the free flow of information between the project teams and the outside world – management, other departments, executives, stakeholders, etc. – to facilitate proper alignment and effective decision-making throughout the entire organization. It is this level of “business collaboration”, as opposed to individual “team collaboration”, which is often missing from a company’s collaboration strategy. All too often, anyone not on the core project team is actually excluded from access to the system of record for project performance and must therefore depend upon periodic status updates or word-of-mouth communications to understand, participate, or make critical business decisions on project information.

Business collaboration provides a level of transparency and visibility to project details throughout an organization. At its heart, business collaboration makes heavy use of enhanced dashboarding and powerful reporting capabilities to expose appropriate project information to those who are outside the core project team. Ideally, facilitation of business collaboration also provides processes and methods for these external resources to submit inquiries and participate in discussions, access project documentation, and all of the other traditional collaboration capabilities as well.

When examining the collaboration strategy within your organization, be sure to keep the big picture in mind. Team-level collaboration is certainly important. But enabling collaboration across departments and across levels within a larger organization can often be even more critical to the success of the entire business.

Tom Stone, Director, Product Management at Daptiv.

Tom has extensive background in ecommerce systems, software development, engineering, product and project management, and technical pre/post sales support. He has over 19 years of experience working for large multi-national and small start-up companies.

Article source: http://www.pmhut.com/why-is-team-collaboration-not-enough

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